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Archive for February, 2011

“Blessed are you when people revile you and persecute you and utter all kinds of evil against you falsely on my account. Rejoice and be glad, for your reward is great in heaven, for in the same way they persecuted the prophets who were before you.” – Matthew 5:11-12

I have always had a problem with getting crazy passionate about issues in places where I have very little influence.  I often find myself frustrated that I can’t make a clear and present difference right this instance, despite always hearing my father’s instructions to work locally.  Last week, it happened again, as it has happened so many times before, I became aware of the brutal murder of David Kato in Uganda and the disgusting manner in which the Anglican Church of Uganda conducted his funeral.  No priest was sent and the lay leader who was sent began a diatribe against homosexuality.  Equally frustrating, a very lame response from the Archbishop of Canterbury that while denouncing the murder of Mr Kato also made no mention of the despicable acts of the church in Uganda.  Perhaps more depressing, the Archbishop stated that this kind of violence was denounced throughout the Anglican Communion, which in light of the Ugandan Anglican church’s refusal to denounce the violence is, well, a mistruth.  Some backstory here, the Episcopal Church of America and a few other members of the Anglican Communion were censured by the same Archbishop last year for ordaining gay and lesbian Bishops despite a request not to by said Archbishop.  Whatever ABC Rowan.

Were my spirits broken by this nonsense?  Was my faith shaken?  Did I think that the concept of organized religion was defunct?  Not at all!!!  In fact, I was galvanized to continue to support local and global efforts to eliminate these injustices, because that is exactly what Jesus did.  Jesus challenged the religious authority, and commanded them to change.  He commanded all of us to Love Our Neighbor as We Love Ourself, second and equal to Loving God.

I was further galvanized by the Bishop of the Episcopal Church’s sermon at the meeting of the Anglican primates in Ireland and my own priest’s sermon about the importance of working for the community to grow the Kingdom.  Thousands upon thousands “organized” in their unity of faith.

I was grounded in the reality of what needed to be done again.  Give in the manner that I can locally, make known the injustices I am aware of everywhere to all who will listen, and give in the manner that I can globally through organizations like Episcopal Relief and Development.  And most importantly, strive to spread the Good News of the Kingdom in every word & action.  As my priest relayed to us in her sermon as said to her at a conference, “If you were accused of being a Christian, would there be enough evidence to convict you?”.

Build the case to be convicted of being a Christian in all that you do.  Amen.

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